Vertical Scrolling in StoryMaker 2

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Vertical Scrolling in StoryMaker 2

StoryMaker 2 will officially launch this fall. The redesign focuses on giving StoryMaker more engaging story creation functionality. To help users and trainers better understand the decisions that went into the redesign, the team wants to share some insights from the process. This post about story creation workflow in the app is the first in a series of posts we’ll put up through the release.

StoryMaker 1’s paging interaction.

StoryMaker 1’s paging interaction.

StoryMaker 1 features “paging” interaction for users to navigate through a story. As you can see in the animation on the right, this is natural if you read a left-to-right (LTR) language such as English or Spanish. Though we planned to reverse the interaction for right-to-left (RTL) languages such as Arabic, we didn’t anticipate the coding difficulty of flipping interaction while maintaining functionality.

As we got closer to release and the time crunch hit, we realized that the only option was to ship StoryMaker 1 with LTR navigation exclusively––a natural for westerners and still somewhat usable for RTL readers but certainly not the intuitive experience we wanted.

Through testing and feedback it was clear that the left-to-right swiping navigation was confusing to our sizable right-to-left audience. We knew we had to change it. But, we didn’t want to just slap some arrows on the screen to make it obvious which direction to go. Instead we wanted to try and find an intuitive answer for anyone using the app, regardless of how their culture reads.

We had two initial thoughts: the Clock and the Scroll.


The Clock

Clocks are such a universal tool it’s hard to even think about using them for anything but telling time. But National Public Radio (NPR) took the basic function of a clock and instead of having it segmented into 12 equal hours, it allows the full circumference to dynamically display the content of a show. They were even kind enough to take photos of some of their programs from their “Book of Clocks” and share them on their tumblr (plus a second set as well for those really excited by this). We were inspired by this innovative approach.

At a moment's glance, you can review these and understand quite a bit about both shows. The power of this display is the story is always a complete circle, regardless of overall length. It doesn’t matter that ‘A Prairie Home Companion’ is twice as long as ‘Morning Edition,’ because they each have their own unique pace and structure. We thought it would make for a very interesting visual display to have all of the clips in a story be a different period of the clock. That way, people could very easily see what clips in their story was taking up the most time.

It became obvious that to implement the clock well would be a lot of work. Many other pieces of the story creation functionality were still up in the air when we started, making it even more difficult to design. Clip cards, narration, and a few other pieces were just coming together.

The clock is an incredibly exciting idea, but we need to find some more time to think through some of these questions and understand how they impact both the story and the person making it. I am excited to think about how we might be able to fit this into future versions. At the moment I see it fitting in beautifully during the editing process of a story.

I know what you’re thinking, it’s just a circle, that can’t be that hard to add? I’ll give you an open question we still have yet to answer: how should we handle secondary/supporting (commonly referred to as b-roll) material when displaying a story in this way? Are those lines that are used in the Morning Edition clock good enough? Can you add clips to the story from this screen?


The Scroll

67% of one handed users keep their phone in their right hand. (illustration from uxmatters.com)

67% of one handed users keep their phone in their right hand. (illustration from uxmatters.com)

In the end, we decided on the scroll. The scroll option is so common that you don’t even notice it. You’ve  had to scroll to reach this paragraph in this blog post. It doesn’t matter what social network, news site, internet forum, or bbs you first signed onto, you probably spend a good amount of your day scrolling from the top of feeds to the bottom of them. We have found there are at least three languages in the world that do read from bottom to the top.

Mobile devices have accelerated the trend of top-to-bottom scrolling to interact with content. A 2013 study by Steven Hoober of UXmatters.com indicates the vast majority of people hold devices vertically. From that orientation, a vertical swipe is a common and easy action for anyone.


Choosing our Battles

We were fascinated by the potential of the clock, and I really hope we can find ways to incorporate it in the future. To help people navigate a story for now, we are going to stick to solutions which are intuitive and natural for as many people as possible, which is why vertically is how navigation works in StoryMaker 2.

Designing software is a complicated process, decisions which feel small can quickly snowball and become immovable mountains before you know it. A tremendous amount of thought has gone into redesigning StoryMaker. I look forward to hearing all your thoughts about it.

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Link: http://smallworldnews.com/blog/vertical-scrolling-in-storymaker-2
Working Together for Change: The v4c Network

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Working Together for Change: The v4c Network

Video, especially mobile video, is today only in its infancy as an advocacy tool. The video4change (v4c) network is at the forefront of shaping how video can be a tool for social change. It draws together some of the best organizations and individuals using mobile video for advocacy today. The v4c site features resources, regular news and chat in several languages. Small World News is a member because we want to enhance the use of video for advocacy and for social change.

V4c is about community. The world of professional journalism and many top-tier advocacy orgs that use video to get their messages out are well-connected and rich in resources. Local activists need to create their own networks to exchange information, share resources and provide support. Small video producers working alone are unlikely to achieve the same results that membership in a network can provide. This is true when it comes to technique, security and especially distribution. Membership also encourages accountability through transparency -- v4c members should be outspoken advocates for the cause -- to help increase the profile of the organization, as well as members of the network.

V4c recognizes the importance of ongoing education for its members and communities. The tools and standards for producing and distributing video are changing almost daily. V4c offers dozens of important resources online to help video activists tell better stories and then get those stories out. In 2013, SWN produced a guide for the v4c network entitled “Effective Video on Low-Cost Devices,” to address some of the best practices individuals can use to improve their videos, without a lot of cash. In addition, the network produced a variety of other titles that address challenges we all face: ‘Videomaking on Android,’ ‘Secure My Video,’ and ‘A Guide to Video Distribution Sites.’

V4c is about results. In 2012 v4c began a collaborative research project with MIT's Center for Civic Media and Open Documentary that examined the network's impact. V4c is now in the second phase of the project and is preparing an Impact Toolkit to help member organizations better assess the impact of their work. A clear mission is key for effective advocacy. The toolkit will help video advocates develop clear strategies, set goals and define success.  It features case studies and the results from several member surveys.  The Impact Toolkit will help advocacy orgs better define what -- exactly -- they want to achieve and how to get there.

From our first project together, Alive in Baghdad, through our more recent projects to develop learning materials and tools such as StoryMaker, we continue to focus on increasing the accessibility to mobile cameras and teaching the skills to use them. When co-founder Steve Wyshywaniuk and I attended the first v4c network gathering 3 years ago, StoryMaker was just an idea. This year, as we met old colleagues and new in Mexico, we were excited to show off the second iteration of StoryMaker and begin many great discussions about using it to collaborate within the network.

If you’d like to know more about the video4change network, drop us a line or head over to v4c.org and check it out for yourself. After last week there are many new collaborations planned. Starting in August I expect we will begin implementing them in earnest. We’ll update you here and at v4c.org as new projects and objectives unfold.

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Link: http://smallworldnews.com/blog/working-together-for-change-the-v4c-network
Making StoryMaker Better: Feedback from V4C

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Making StoryMaker Better: Feedback from V4C

Small World News is a member of the Video 4 Change network. Steve and I attended the Latin America regional conference in Mexico City last week. The gathering brought together more than 30 activists from across Central and South America. The v4c networks provides support and resources for the use of video to document human rights abuses and encourage social change.

StoryMaker has been downloaded by users around the globe but this was our first chance to work closely with activists and citizen journalists in Latin America. We have been working on improving StoryMaker’s usefulness for Cuban journalists specifically, and Latin Americans in general. The conference was an opportunity to gather feedback from journalists, filmmakers, and fellow trainers. We tested some of our assumptions earlier this year in Turkey, but continued assessment by highly diverse groups of testers is key to building relevant, useful tools.

The current drafts of our photo lessons were extremely well received. Diego, who works on community video projects in Peru, looked up from the first lesson to say “I learned something new!” Gustavo, an activist from El Salvador, felt the lessons were “very practical.” Laura, an experience trainer from Mexico was particularly impressed with the use of color and black and white to demonstrate how layers are used in photography.

We also received a fair amount of feedback about how we might improve the lessons. In particular, the “call to action” feature––the practical work at the end of each lesson needs to be clearer.

Each path provides example content, but testers said its impact could be improved by making clearer what the example intends to teach. For instance in the case shown here, we intend to teach the user one important use of the background layer in photography. It appears now that this text would be more helpful as an initial card, introducing the concept, followed by the photo with text that says something like “In this photo the background shows the protest, adding more context to the photo of a protester speaking with a passerby.” By separating the learning that teaches “what might a background layer used for” from the explanation of the specific example, we can reinforce the user’s learning.

Overall, our testers felt the paths were a great introduction to the basics of photography. They also requested some additional paths, some of the highlights were:

  • How can I ensure photos shot with a mobile have proper lighting?

  • How can I write good captions for my photos?

  • How can I shoot good portraits?

  • How can I make a great photo series?

  • What are the different types of shots one might use in photography?

In the coming weeks we will be implementing some changes to improve the lessons, based on the feedback we have received. We will also consider what additional lessons to include in the Mobile Photo 101 curriculum. By this fall, you’ll be able to see these lessons in a new release of StoryMaker that will also support publishing photo series to Facebook and Flickr. We look forward to hearing your feedback as well. Consider joining StoryMaker’s Beta Community on Google+ to get a first look at new lessons and features before they become public in the play store.


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Link: http://smallworldnews.com/blog/making-storymaker-better-feedback-from-v4c
On the Road in Mexico with v4c

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On the Road in Mexico with v4c

In 2012 Small World News was invited to join the Video4Change network. Video4Change provides support and resources for the use of video to document human rights abuses and encourage social change. As part of the network SWN produced a guide called “Effective Video on Low-Cost Devices.”  This week we’re reuniting with old colleagues and meeting recent additions to the network in Mexico to discuss collaborations and the future of the network.

Over the weekend we will open the event up to the public for a day. Visitors from Mexico and across Latin America will be invited to learn more about v4c and participate in a series of workshops. Small World New will running a workshop on mobile video basics. In addition, we will be meeting Latin American media makers to get some feedback on our work developing new StoryMaker templates and lessons for Latin America with a focus on supporting journalists and activists in Cuba.

During the v4c gathering we’re hoping to energize our colleagues around the use of StoryMaker. We also want to demonstrate how Small World News can support them in other ways, such as developing curriculum materials and running training-of-trainers (ToT) workshops. In particular we look forward to feedback on StoryMaker and learning what is missing from StoryMaker to make it most useful for those focused on video4change.

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Link: http://smallworldnews.com/blog/on-the-road-in-mexico-with-v4c
BETTER ELECTION REPORTING AND MONITORING WITH STORYMAKER

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BETTER ELECTION REPORTING AND MONITORING WITH STORYMAKER

Five years ago Small World News was very much involved in devising and supporting innovative election reporting and monitoring projects. Our Alive in Afghanistan Ushahidi instance was credited with being one of the first international sources reporting fraud in the Afghan elections of 2009 and 2010. In addition to providing training and consulting to Pajhwok Afghan News, in 2010 we had the opportunity to work with international and local election monitors, from Democracy International and the Free Election Foundation of Afghanistan (FEFA).

We revisited election reporting in Afghanistan for the 2014 presidential campaign. John Smock produced training material for radio coverage of elections and ran a couple of related workshops. Last December I ran a training for journalists in Burundi ahead of the elections scheduled for this summer. Now we are working on new curriculum in preparation for the upcoming elections in Iran scheduled for February 2015.

Recently I have been investigating how the new paths format in StoryMaker might be used specifically for election reporting and monitoring. I believe we can set some very real and very attainable goals for improving coverage.

Election reporting far too often deteriorates into little more than “horse race” coverage. Important community issues get lost in the “he said, she said,” and mudslinging of campaign trail reporting. Paths and assignments within StoryMaker could be developed to encourage interviews with citizens about issues important to them and communities that all too often are overlooked. News agencies could then use these stories to help direct coverage beyond press conferences and campaign stops. Advocacy organizations could use these stories to call candidates out on specific issues.

Election monitoring has its own challenges. Independent international monitors are often very limited in the media they can use to document issues in and around polling stations. They also have a very narrow mandate––things like vote counting, and assessing activity at the polls. But, the most important reporting and monitoring often happen in the days before or after the election and away from polling stations.

To address this local organizations have developed an assortment of solutions. For example, FEFA in Afghanistan typically assumes the role of observing violations of election laws. Two years ago in Pakistan, The Punjab Information Technology board created an app for monitoring various violations, called Punjab Elections Monitoring. In the case of international organizations such as Democracy International, if they are able to recruit and manage a local monitoring effort separate from election day responsibilities, they do work similar to local organizations.

StoryMaker could streamline election monitoring and reporting by enabling organizations to create paths and assignments specifically tailored to the issues on which these organizations focus. Rather than rolling a new app for each issue, election or project, organizations might partner with the StoryMaker Coalition to create well-designed paths on topics such as: monitoring specific threats, interviewing voters on specific topics, or asking StoryMaker users to submit stories about the most important issues affecting how they will vote.

By designing specific paths in StoryMaker, we could dramatically improve the impact and relevance of election reporting and monitoring around the world. A single, well-designed platform would also allow for the creation of a global repository of election-related stories and data.

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Link: http://smallworldnews.com/blog/better-election-reporting-and-monitoring-with-storymaker
Journalism and Activism: Bridging the Gap through Citizen Reporting

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Journalism and Activism: Bridging the Gap through Citizen Reporting

Once upon a time, you were a journalist if you adhered to a set of clear standards in your reporting and published the results in a recognized news outlet. You were an activist if you produced stories with an agenda to be published in an outlet that advocated for that issue. There were unscrupulous—or at least amateurish—people working on both sides of this very tribal divide, and the divide itself wasn’t alway as defined as people, especially journalists, would like to admit.

The decline of traditional media along with the rise of the Internet and mobile tools have blurred the line even further. For us in the community of citizen journalists and mobile reporters, the lack of a clear distinction between journalists and activists is an opportunity. We can use it to define a new, hybrid identity for ourselves.

Today advocacy organizations like Human Rights Watch publish top-flight investigative journalism—and audiences trust it to be accurate. Some of the best coverage from countries like Syria or China comes from people who would define themselves as activists and appears on social sites such as YouTube. In these countries and many others, the professional media is so tightly controlled by government that the only independent coverage available is produced by activists. Sure, some of these people have a very one-sided agenda and some carry guns. But, some are producing powerful, well-informed stories about important issues.

More progressive journalists and publications are moving toward a sort of middle ground. They embrace concepts with names like “community journalism” or “solutions journalism” that seek to balance the best of what solid reporting can bring with the need to advocate on important local issues. Another scenario involves journalists like Nicholas Kristof. He is using his experience as a journalist and The New York Times as a platform to advocate in the fight against human trafficking.

So what does all this mean for mobile reporters and activists? The online audience is huge and becoming ever more sophisticated in how it consumes news and information. It does not necessarily make a distinction between journalism and advocacy. It wants high production values––video and audio that are well-produced and reporting that is informative, accurate and transparent. It wants passion from credible producers about issues and reports that are smart  and encourage people to get involved––especially on local issues overlooked by big media.

Journalism that is nonpartisan and without a call to action does not have the appeal it once did. But media activism that  is poorly produced and offers little more than an ill-informed, sentimental snapshot of an issue doesn’t work either. This is the space we can inhabit. Have a look at India Unheard or Mobile Community Zimbabwe. Both are community platforms that provide media training and a strong platform for community-based journalism.

Really great opportunities always come with big challenges. High quality, informative content is hard to produce. It’s up to the community of activists and mobile journalists to set high standards for itself as we define our own, unique role in a rapidly evolving media landscape.

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Link: http://smallworldnews.com/blog/journalism-and-activism-bridging-the-gap-through-citizen-reporting
Why we already signed up for a Apple News account

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Why we already signed up for a Apple News account

 

At the end of May John Smock wrote about Facebook’s latest effort to help improve the mobile news experience with its Instant articles. Two weeks ago we saw another tech giant, Apple, relaunch its mediocre Newsstand app as News, betting on a rebrand to help the company become the home of news for iOS users.

You can watch the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference keynote address online. The News announcement begins at roughly minute 52).

It’s still too early to tell if this product will be a win for Apple. In traditional Apple style, the company intends to control many of the design options.

This approach has clearly worked well for the company with music. Apple’s keen eye for design and sleek style helped people become comfortable purchasing music online in the early days of iTunes. But, Apple has always left the music to the artists. When it comes to news, typography and layout are so integrated into delivery that for some publishers it is almost indistinguishable from the actual news content.

Publishers use design to define their identity and to differentiate themselves in the marketplace -- be it typography, photography, web or even memes. Design has always been a key piece of Apple’s success, but Apple has failed to recreate the success of its music business with the publishing business.

The original Newsstand app (below) reduced newspaper and magazine covers to thumbnails, which just doesn’t work at the scale at which they display.

 
Newsstand screenshot in iOS 5. (via    macworld   )

Newsstand screenshot in iOS 5. (via macworld)

 

Publication icons in the new app are cleaner. They feature artwork that makes sense at scale and, at the same time, let publications brand themselves.

Apple News in iOS 9.  (via apple.)

Apple News in iOS 9. (via apple.)

Apple hopefully has learned from its mistakes and plans to start providing powerful tools and options to help publishers use design to distinguish content in the app.

The good news is the Apple News platform is going to soon be open and available to anyone willing to set up an Apple ID. Facebook, by contrast, is currently testing Instant Articles with a small set of publishers. Facebook is being vague about when they will open it up. Apple News undoubtedly will motivate them.

In the interest of researching what those tools might look like and how citizen journalists, smaller organizations and publishers can best take advantage of them, we are signed up to be a News Publisher. Our blog is submitted for approval and we hope to see it available for reading in the app when it launches this fall.

You can learn how to apply too on the apple site here. If you have questions, I suggest you check out their FAQ

For additional reading, check out this essay by Nilay Patel at the Verge.  Patel brilliantly summarizes how Apple is attempting to reduce the music and news industries into being mere features of the iPhone. This is not to say this is inevitable or even likely, but it is valuable to track development in mobile news when companies the size of Apple are involved.

Skepticism may be the best course. It’s very likely that in another four years I’ll be writing the same article. Four years ago TechCrunch  was claiming “Apple's Digital Newsstand Just Disrupted The Publishing Industry”. 

Small World News will see how well News works for us and share our results with you.

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Link: http://smallworldnews.com/blog/why-we-already-signed-up-for-a-apple-news-account
StoryMaker: path to a better workshop

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StoryMaker: path to a better workshop

The results from our latest workshop demonstrate the primary thesis of our new paths was proved overwhelmingly true. In last  week’s post, titled Reinventing The Media Workshop with StoryMaker I wrote that by providing tailored, workshop-specific assignments in StoryMaker, we can improve our success rate in the classroom. Our participants confirmed this by delivering more than fifty complete stories.

In the span of three days, each of twenty three Libyan activists and journalists who came to the workshop in Istanbul showed clear improvement in their skills as filmmakers and storytellers. By preparing assignments ahead of time as paths, and including additional tips and directions inside StoryMaker, we reduced classroom time and maximized practical work.

Most of the participants had little or no video storytelling experience. Their first videos, based on an “Interview your partner” assignment, directed participant to ask the partner one question and shoot two supporting clips. A path in StoryMaker walked them through the process step-by-step, allowing them to review instructions while shooting without the trainer present.

The first assignment  was intended to teach very basic skills. As you can see in many of the videos, most of the participants created typical beginner videos which demonstrate little understanding of how to create a clear narrative. On the visual side, they failed to use distinct shots types that work to advance the story.

The path for the second assignment, “Shoot a Process Story,” focused on constructing a narrative, and explained how narrative is constructed with different types of shots. The process videos began to show improvement, however one of the most important skills, combining very close shots with more distant shots, continued to elude many of them.

You can see an example here, titled "Checking In" or view their process story videos over on youtube.

By the time the participants shot the final, narrated stories everyone had showed incredible growth. The stories demonstrated narrative arcs, variation in shot type, and were at times funny, sad, and informative. By the end of the workshop it was clear that everyone was prepared to start focusing more intently on the craft of storytelling - building complex narratives that use emotion to move the audience.

You can see many of their videos below. Unfortunately, due to concerns of some participants regarding cultural norms and individual security, we cannot share all of the final videos.

We probably didn’t go far enough in putting tips and technical skills inside StoryMaker paths. Teaching more technical skills inside the paths will increase the time available to focus on the practical work of making stories, reviewing stories, and advising participants on techniques specific to their needs.

We will continue to streamline StoryMaker and enhance the ability to provide tips and direction at the point of production. This will strengthen StoryMaker as a stand-alone tool that helps users who cannot attend trainings tell better stories. At the same time, when StoryMaker is used in a workshop, it will increase the role of the trainer as mentor, not teaching just basic skills, but advising participants how they can build on the basics to create great stories.


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Link: http://smallworldnews.com/blog/storymaker-path-to-a-better-workshop
Reinventing the Media Workshop with StoryMaker

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Reinventing the Media Workshop with StoryMaker

One of the most exciting new developments in StoryMaker 2 is the ability to create unique templates, which we call storypaths. A storypath is a series of illustrated, step-by-step interactive screens that walk users through how to produce audio, video and photos for a specific story types. This path structure enables us to create tailored assignment instruction for a wide variety of uses. Paths can be created to provide instructions on how to shoot a portrait or how to cover an event like an election. Individual storypaths are grouped by topic into related packs.

Lately we have been working on creating more specific paths directed at very specific projects. StoryMaker 2 initially shipped with a very general set of instructional  paths that provide guidance to help users create a basic story. StoryMaker has produced downloadable packs in Farsi, Arabic and Spanish for journalists and activists working in the MENA region and elsewhere. We are currently working on a project for Cuban users, specifically improving photography skills and basic understanding of how to tell photo stories with a mobile phone.

Beginning last week we took on a new experiment to see if we can tailor classroom assignments for a workshop in videomaking for journalists and activist from Libya. Beginning with our Alive in Libya project Small World News has been working in Libya since the 2011 revolution. Despite great promise following the revolution, the absence of a strong central government in Libya has led to widespread political violence, often at the hands of armed tribal militias, and ideological extremism.

For this workshop I created 5 individual paths:

  • What do you hope to learn
  • Interview your partner
  • Shoot a Process Story
  • Create a Story with Narration
  • What’s the most important thing you learned.

The first path and final path are aimed at bookending the workshop. We think this approach will help improve monitoring and evaluation to judge the impact of the workshops more clearly. The other three paths focus on first getting the participant to demonstrate their current skill level and familiarity with mobiles by asking each to interview their partner and shoot two clips related to the interview. From there I asked them to create a story showing a clear process with three clips, and a final complete story with five clips and a narration to add context and depth.

In the past we have depended on workshop participants to listen well and remember the exact directions provided for each assignment in class. This has always proved challenging and produced mixed results. Videomaking alone is a very complex skill. When you add translation, you are not always sure the participant will understand and remember every detail. With these new paths we can provide direction in the classroom and reminders of exactly what we discussed as they work.

In addition to content for specific projects  Small World News is developing a library of lesson packs/packages from which users can choose. These packs include theoretical content, such as journalism ethics. They also include practical training on a wide variety of topics. We are developing material to help users get the most out of StoryMaker as a tool for human rights observers and activists.

I’ll update you at the end of the workshop with the results, hopefully including some stories as well as my analysis on how to improve the paths further in the future.

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Link: http://smallworldnews.com/blog/reinventing-the-media-workshop-with-storymaker
The newest thing in mobile news: facebook's Instant Article

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The newest thing in mobile news: facebook's Instant Article

This month Facebook introduced ‘Instant Article’, an enhancement to its mobile app that allows news organizations to publish articles directly to your news feed from their own Facebook-hosted news pages. The New York Times, National Geographic, Buzzfeed, BBC News, Der Speigel and a few others have signed on.

For users, this will mean no more slow-to-load pages from links (eight seconds on average) and the addition of a bunch of other features including: the ability to zoom in on high res photos, auto-play video scrolling, audio captions and interactive maps. A “richer user experience,” says Facebook. Pretty cool.

So what does this mean for the community of mobile/social journalist, activists and storytellers? For starters it is confirmation of what we do. Facebook, by far the world’s largest social platform, and big media players are putting their money behind the need to do a better job of bringing the news to where an ever-growing number of readers already are - mobile devices and social platforms.

Facebook has not announced plans to make the tools and services on which Instant Article is built available to smaller web publishers, although Facebook has a form for interested organizations. Exclusivity is undoubtedly part of the initial appeal for big media players. 

For now Instant Articles is available only on iOS, and while you can see Instant Article content on your computer, you do not get the touch-screen features or other interactive enhancements. Facebook hopes users will increase the time they spend on its network as a result of the features. It will also receive a percentage of the ad sales from news site pages.

Big web news publishers report that they get about 60 percent of their traffic -- and related ad revenue -- through referrals from Facebook. But, some are concerned that they could lose control of their content through platforms like Instant Article. To win over reluctant partners Facebook agreed to break with its traditional ad revenue model and let publishers keep a percentage of ad revenue from Facebook hosted news sites. Facebook also will surely give Instant Article publishers juice through its ranking algorithm.

Whether Instant Article succeeds or fails as an experimental business model isn’t important. Either way, it will work to develop a larger audience with an expectation for mobile content that is more visual, interactive and informative.

Small World News plans to look into becoming an Instant Article publisher as an experiment in what Instant Article might mean for our community. We will keep you posted.

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Link: http://smallworldnews.com/blog/the-newest-thing-in-mobile-news-facebooks-instant-article